David Kelly’s Curated Content for the Week of 2/27/17

kelly_davidI read through a number of articles and blog posts each day, and every Monday I curate a few of my favorites for members of the eLearning Guild Community, and for the learning and performance field as a whole. Each shared resource includes a brief introduction explaining why I find the link to be of value and recommend you read it.

Here’s the content for this week:

Now you can take Pixar’s ‘The Art of Storytelling’ course for free by Emily Price
Some of the most popular movies in the last decade have come from the world of Pixar. While the animation in the films is certainly impressive, the secret sauce of those films is arguably the stories themselves, and how they are crafted. We can all learn a great deal about storytelling from the work Pixar has done, and they’ve now given us a great tool to do just that. Pixar’s “The Art of Storytelling” is a new course that is available FREE as part of Pixar’s collaboration with Kahn Academy called Pixar in a Box. It’s a piece of elearning all elearning designers should consider taking.

Think your slides are great? Ask the audience by Mike Taylor
Slides are a major tool for sharing content. They’re often to foundation for meetings, speaking engagements, and elearning programs. As such, it’s important that we use them as effectively as possible. This post examines some of the common mistakes people make with slides, and provides alternatives that can make the next group of slides you create much more effective.

What’s the secret of a successful learning technology implementation? by Donald H Taylor
There are many factors that influence successful implementation of a learning technology. While we often look at proven processes to follow that can point the way in projects like this, process itself is only one piece of the equation. This post explores some of the other things successful teams bring to a learning technology implementation.
While the post is specifically written towards a learning technology implementation, many of the points made apply in broader contexts. My favorite lines: “Following a model unquestioningly is potentially catastrophic. When that happens, the model ceases to be a tool in the service of change and becomes instead its driver”.

7 Gamification Myths, Debunked by Amy Jo Kim
Gamification is one of the hottest buzzwords in our industry, and I’ve always disliked buzzwords. It’s not the words I have an issue with; it’s the concept of a buzzword. I define buzzword as “A term whose usage has spread faster than it’s understanding.” Gamification is definitely in that space, and posts like this help bridge the gaps that exist when buzzwords spark myths. If you’re interested in gamification, this is a must read post.

Learning One Thing at a Time Is Common Sense, and It’s Wrong by Neil Peterson
When we want to learn something new, it makes sense to dive into it fully, blocking out distractions and putting as much as we can of everything else aside to, as the phrase goes, “focus on the task at hand”. However, some research (referenced in this article) may indicate that learning more than one thing at a time may actually strengthen long-term learning.

VR Working Out Loud Week
Two trends in L&D – Virtual Reality and Working Out Loud – intersect this week. If you’re interested in VR or in watching people narrate their work by working out loud, check out what’s being shared during VR Work Out Loud week. Full details are in the post.

What are you reading?

If you recently read an article, blog post, or other resource from someone else that you think we should consider sharing in a future Curated Industry Content post, please feel free to send a link to the resource to David Kelly along with a few sentences describing why you think the resource is valuable.

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